Ottoman Music

Ottoman music is a synthesis, carrying within it a great many historical riches. It emerged as the result of a sharing process between the Turks and the minorities living alongside them, the Byzantines, Greeks, Persians, Arabs, Jews, Armenians etc. It reached its golden age in the private school in the Ottoman palace. No country that employed that system was able to reach the level of artistry attained by the Ottomans.

The form of music today generally known as Turk Sanat Muzigi, or Ottoman Classical Music, matured, developed in form and aesthetics and came to assume the identity of a form of classical music in parallel to the establishment, growth and increasing strength of the Ottoman state itself. This variety of music furnished products dealing with many subjects, such as religion, love and war.
Ottoman music was formed and given voice in the Fasil, itself based on unity of mode. Works composed within the same melodic structure (makam) , or mode, set out and played in a particular order. In a genuine fasil, there will be works for voice and for saz.
Form of instrumental pieces employed in Ottoman music: Pesrev, Saz Semaisi, Taksim. Pesrev: Generally composed in major rhythmic patterns, such as "Darb-i Fetih", "Sakil", "Muhammes" and "Devr-i Kebir", or sometimes in minor ones, such as "Duyek".
Turkish Folk/Local Music are forms of music created by people settled in one particular location, played or recited with great affection, which have become the joint creation of the people of the area in question, and which have been passed down and kept alive down to the present day. Such music bears the traces of local cultures, and the names of the composers are generally unknown.
Ottoman music is a synthesis, carrying within it a great many historical riches. It emerged as the result of a sharing process between the Turks and the minorities living alongside them, the Byzantines, Greeks, Persians, Arabs, Jews, Armenians..
Turkish Janissary (Mehter) Music: In the Turkish tradition, janissary music is a sign of majesty, splendour and might, rather than a vehicle for merriment. The majestic and sacred nature of the state are reflected in the banging of the drum.
"Come, come, whatever you are, it doesn’t matter whether you are an infidel, an idolater or a Pagan, still come. Come, our convent is not a place of dispair. Come, even if you violated your swear a houndres times, come again."
Mevlana