Turkish Percussion InstrumentsTurkish Percussion Instruments

Turkish Percussion Instruments. Darbuka, Daire/Tef (tambourine), Davul (drum), Kudum (small double drum). General information.

Darbuka

Darbuka

Instruments similar to the darbuka, of various shapes and sizes, were used by civilisations in Anatolia, Mesopotamia and Central Asia in ancient times. In later periods, these changed and developed, but continued to be used in the same areas.

The Darbuka has been known by different names at different times and in different places. These include: dumbek, dumbelek, deplek, deblek, donbek, tombek, darbeki and debulak. This percussion instrument was originally made using baked earth, although this increasingly gave way to such materials as copper, aluminium, various metal compounds, plaster, porcelai wood and glass fibres.

Generally speaking, the darbuka resembles a pipe with one narrow end and one wide one, and was formerly covered in leather, although synthetic materials are now preferred. The skin is passed over a hoop, and the instrument is tuned by stretching the skin with screws. The body carries various forms of decoration, and these change from region to region.

Instruments similar to the darbuka, of various shapes and sizes, were used by civilisations in Anatolia, Mesopotamia and Central Asia in ancient times. In later periods, these changed and developed, but continued to be used in the same areas.
The davul (or screw davul) is one of the very oldest instruments, having been used down the ages by the various civilisations of Anatolia, and later by communities in Central Asia. Despite some changes in form and construction technique, the percussion instrument that has come down to the present day is actually one of the least altered traditional Turkish musical instruments.
The Daire/Tef (tambourine) percussion instrument was used in various ways by the ancient civilisations in Anatolia, Mesopotamia and Egypts, and by those that followed, as well as by the Ottomans for both religious and secular purposes. It then moved on from those regions to Europe.
Kasik (spoon) is a Turkish percussion instrument. The ones made from boxwood are particularly favoured. The handles are taken between the fingers and the oval parts are held towards the inside of the hand ina backto back position.
Kudum (small double drum) consists of a pair of small, hemispherical drums. When used for religious purposes they were known as "kudüm", and as "nakkare" when used in a secular context or in mehter music. It was one of the four main instruments used in dervish mystical music (the others being the ney, rebap and halile) before its enrichment with instruments such as the tambur, kemençe and kanun.